As a stay at home mom I recommend "Medical Coding" as a wonderful work from home option. Yes, you will need training. You can't just code medical records without having proper training. However, this is a real and promising career. I used to work for "Career Step" and they have an awesome Medical Coding course. http://www.referral.careerstep.com/mc?ref=43233 Their training is done online and is self-paced. You could finish the program in 4 months but 6 months is probably more realistic. They do however give you up to a year to get it all done. Their program prepares you to become certified by the American Health Information Management Association and the American Academy of Professional Coders. They work with companies such as CIOX Health, Lexicode, OS2-HCS, TrustHCS, Inovalon, Mckesson that hire their grads to work from home right out of the program. The average salary for this career is about $40,000. Their entire program including books, instructors and job assistance is around $3,000 and they offer sweet payment plans. If you want more info, reference links or have questions let me know @ [email protected]
When you think of work-from-home jobs, do you think of low-paying gigs? If so, it might be time to adjust your perspective. While there are plenty of entry-level, non-professional roles for people who want to work from home, those aren’t the only game in town. Professionals can find telecommuting jobs that satisfy their desire to keep moving forward in their career and get paid appropriately for their experience and skills.
Insurance is an industry that hires a lot of telecommuters, and the work-from-home jobs available are quite a diverse lot, ranging from underwriters and appraisers to case managers and insurance agents, as well as positions in IT and project management. While many insurance companies hire these positions directly as work-at-home jobs, others may offer flexible options for existing employees or part-time telecommuting.
Although the concepts of "telecommuting" and "telework" are closely related, there is a difference between the two. All types of technology-assisted work conducted outside a centrally located work space (including work undertaken in the home, outside calls, etc.) are regarded as telework. Telecommuters often maintain a traditional office and usually work from an alternative work site from 1 to 3 days a week.[7] Telecommuting refers more specifically to work undertaken at a location that reduces commuting time. These locations can be inside the home or at some other remote workplace, which is facilitated through a broadband connection, computer or phone lines,[8] or any other electronic media used to interact and communicate.[9] As a broader concept than telecommuting, telework has four dimensions in its definitional framework: work location, that can be anywhere outside a centralized organizational work place; usage of ICTs (information and communication technologies) as technical support for telework; time distribution, referring to the amount of time replaced in the traditional workplace; and the diversity of employment relationships between employer and employee, ranging from contract work to traditional full-time employment.[10]
What Employees Say: “Company is comprised of hard-working individuals who are extremely passionate about what they do. We have done wonderful things for communities through foundations, IBO’s and our own employees giving back. It is exciting to be part of a growing company that has allowed me to use my knowledge to help build my department. I am proud to see how far we have come..” —Current Employee

If you have as little as four hours to spare in a week, you can become a virtual assistant for Time Etc. Assignments vary from social media management to writing for clients — you can choose the option that makes the best use of your skills. Don’t worry, if you’re a jack or jill-of-all-trades you can become a general assistant and help people get more done.
Telecommuting, also called telework, teleworking, working from home, mobile work, remote work, and flexible workplace,[1][2] is a work arrangement in which employees do not commute or travel (e.g. by bus or car) to a central place of work, such as an office building, warehouse, or store. Teleworkers in the 21st century often use mobile telecommunications technology such as Wi-Fi-equipped laptop or tablet computers and smartphones to work from coffee shops; others may use a desktop computer and a landline phone at their home. According to a Reuters poll, approximately "one in five workers around the globe, particularly employees in the Middle East, Latin America and Asia, telecommute frequently and nearly 10 percent work from home every day."[3] In the 2000s, annual leave or vacation in some organizations was seen as absence from the workplace rather than ceasing work, and some office employees used telework to continue to check work e-mails while on vacation.[citation needed]
Being an at-home call-center rep requires a computer and may require specific software or equipment. A great phone voice helps as well, as does any experience in customer service, data entry, retail sales, or management. Dozens of sites list job openings for call-center representatives, including Upwork.com, Freelancer.com, and SimplyHired.com. However, you may also find listings offered by local businesses in your local newspaper.
Since 2000, US federal law (Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act) requires each Executive agency to establish a telecommuting policy allowing eligible employees to participate in telecommuting to the maximum extent possible, so long as the employee’s performance is not diminished.[100] Notably, telework is not an employee right, i.e., Federal law mandates that agencies must establish telework programs, but does not give individual employees a legal right to telework.[101]
AOJ Work From Home Jobs connects traditional job seekers with non-traditional work from home opportunity. We're really passionate about connecting jobs seekers with opportunity online. With over 20 years combined experience we're confident we can help you get online and earning income from home. We get that people are seeking ways to supplement their income online, or even replace their 9 to 5! If you're here reading our company bio and would like a little more information, please feel free to reach out to us by email: [email protected] We look forward to working with you.
Pretty much every serious blogger and online entrepreneur I know has at least one virtual assistant. Think of a VA like an administrative assistant at a regular office building, except they are working remotely. Duties can include practically any administrative task you can think of – including handling emails, bookkeeping, completing sales, customer service, editing websites, and much more. Specializations in areas like social media management or online ad management is another option.
Data entry encompasses different job titles, but they all usually include inputting alphabetic, numeric, or symbolic data into a company's system from written or audio files using a keyboard and computer. Most legitimate companies hiring for this type of work hire people as independent contractors and not full-time employees. Data entry jobs are frequently the bait in work-from-home scams, so be sure to examine opportunities carefully. Never pay for kits or software.
Being an at-home call-center rep requires a computer and may require specific software or equipment. A great phone voice helps as well, as does any experience in customer service, data entry, retail sales, or management. Dozens of sites list job openings for call-center representatives, including Upwork.com, Freelancer.com, and SimplyHired.com. However, you may also find listings offered by local businesses in your local newspaper.
Hi! I'm Jeff. A personal finance nerd and entrepreneur at heart, I'm here to bring you all the latest cool ways to make and save extra money. I've been quoted in several online publications, including Entrepreneur, NBC News, GoBankingRates, Student Loan Hero, Business.com, Credit Karma, The Simple Dollar, US News & World Report, Lifehacker, MSN Money, Moneyish, Zumper, IdeaMensch, Discover Bank, PrimeRates, Credit.com, Yahoo! Finance, Club Thrifty, Guru Focus, Rent Track, Fit Small Business, Coupon Chief, and more.
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