Since work hours are less regulated in telework, employee effort and dedication are far more likely to be measured purely in terms of output or results. Fewer, if any, traces of non-productive work activities (research, self-training, dealing with technical problems or equipment failures) and time lost on unsuccessful attempts (early drafts, fruitless endeavors, abortive innovations) are visible to employers. Piece rate, commissions, or other performance-based compensation also become more likely for telecommuters. Furthermore, major chunks of per-employee expenses are absorbed by the telecommuter himself - from simple coffee, water, electricity, and telecommunications services, to huge capital expenses like office equipment or software licenses. Thus, hours spent on the job tend to be underestimated and expenses under-reported, creating overly optimistic figures of productivity gains and savings, some or all of those in fact coming out of the telecommuter's time and pocket.[citation needed]
What Employees Say: “The money is uncapped, and you’re honestly in the driver seat of your bonus. This is the best (and easiest) incentive package I’ve ever had in the work field! There are also so many other perks that come with the job such as great benefits, fun culture, and TONS of room for growth. Amex really does believe in you!!.” —Current Employee
Bloggers are typically people who enjoy a particular topic and enjoy writing about it on a semi-regular to regular basis. If you have something you are passionate about, or are an expert in a particular area, you can consider starting a blog. Blogs are a great way to: teach people about a particular skill, entertain, or share about life experiences.
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