Working remotely for an established company is similar to working a desk job except you get to work at home. Most jobs require you to chat with customers online or via the phone, but their biggest draw is the fact that you’ll earn an hourly wage and receive a (relatively) steady paycheck. You’ll usually be asked to work regular hours, but you can do it in your pajamas if you’d like. Even better, some companies might actually provide you with benefits.

Another flexible non-phone option in the educational field is test scoring. There are a few reputable companies that do hire home-based workers to score everything from standardized tests to essays. Before you apply, you should know that ETS and Pearson (listed below) do require that you have certain qualifications and/or past teaching experience before they'll let you become a scorer. WriteScore on the other hand requires just a two-year college degree.
Even better, the national median wage for web developers was $66,130 in 2016, with the top 10% earning an average of $119,550. And you typically don’t need an advanced degree to begin working in this field. All you need is some postsecondary education, applicable experience, and a portfolio of successful sites you’ve built and managed. There are even intensive coding boot camps designed to teach programming skills in just a few short months.
Pitches to be your own boss. Our Consumer Action Center is hearing from a lot of callers who go to help-wanted sites, find an opportunity that looks good and then contact the supposed employer. It turns out to be a pitch for owning your own business, with promises of huge money. Unfortunately, the only ones making money are the people pushing startup kits and related costs.
Study results from the 2013 Regus Global Economic Indicator were published in September 2013 and showed that 48% of business managers worldwide work remotely for at least half their working week. The study engaged over 26,000 business managers across 90 countries, with 55% of respondents stating that the effective management of remote workers is an attainable goal. Following the release of the results, Regus CEO Mark Dixon stated: "The business people we speak with tell us that trust and freedom play a key role in remote management, and once these are in place the benefits are clear for all to see: greater productivity, improved staff retention and lower operating costs."[21] A living list of fully distributed companies can be found here. Forrester Research’s US Telecommuting Forecast reporting that 34 million Americans work from home and the number is expected to reach a staggering 63 million – or 43% of the U.S. workforce – by 2016. Cisco reports that the company has generated an estimated annual savings of $277 million in productivity by allowing employees to telecommute and telework. And Intuit reports that by 2020, more than 40% of the American workforce, or 60 million people, will be freelancers, contractors and temp workers. In the UK between 2007 and 2012, the number of employees who usually work from home increased by 13% - an increase of almost half a million people, taking the total to over 4 million employees out of a UK workforce of 30 million.[22]
Working remotely for an established company is similar to working a desk job except you get to work at home. Most jobs require you to chat with customers online or via the phone, but their biggest draw is the fact that you’ll earn an hourly wage and receive a (relatively) steady paycheck. You’ll usually be asked to work regular hours, but you can do it in your pajamas if you’d like. Even better, some companies might actually provide you with benefits.
Technical Support/Computer Support Specialist: Work with customers and employees who may be having problems with software, computers, or equipment like printers or scanners. Responsibilities may include troubleshooting solutions, testing and fixing faulty equipment, addressing password and login issues, and possibly providing feedback to supervisors.
IRC is searching for Market Research Caller candidates who can work from their homes. Candidates are paid an hourly rate, $15.00/hour, as an independent contractor and can work full or part-time. Your pay is NOT commission-based or dependent on the number of results that are developed. Please note that this is a business-to-business telemarketing position using our cloud-based telesales system designed for virtual agents. The position will require cold-calling our targeted lists using your own WINDOWS-based computer, computer headset and high-speed internet access. After training, the days and number of hours you work are flexible although you must commit to at least of four hours per day during the 5-day working week. For more information about IRC, please visit us at: www.interactiveresearch.biz
At work, you had to keep your desk neat so that you looked organized—and sure, it’s always helpful to see the top of your desk. But at home, who cares if clutter collects around you? Well, don’t fall into that trap (especially video conference calls are part of your routine). While you might miss the building services team, who used to wipe down your crusty keyboard and empty your waste paper baskets every night, it’s ultimately up to you to keep your space spic and span so you can do your best work.

When you think of work-from-home jobs, do you think of low-paying gigs? If so, it might be time to adjust your perspective. While there are plenty of entry-level, non-professional roles for people who want to work from home, those aren’t the only game in town. Professionals can find telecommuting jobs that satisfy their desire to keep moving forward in their career and get paid appropriately for their experience and skills.
Turnover intention, or the desire to leave the organization, is lower for teleworkers.[35] Those teleworkers who experienced greater professional isolation actually had lower turnover intent.[48] One study found that by increasing feedback and task identity through clear communication of goals, objectives, and expectations, turnover intent decreased in teleworkers and quality of work output increased.[73]
The inconsistent findings regarding telework and satisfaction may be explained by a more complicated relationship. Presumably because of the effects of autonomy, initial job satisfaction increases as the amount of telecommuting increases; however, as the individual telecommutes more, declines in feedback and task significance lead job satisfaction to level off and decrease slightly.[81] Thus, the amount of time teleworking influences the relationship between telework and job satisfaction. Barriers to continued growth of telecommuting include distrust from employers and personal disconnectedness for employees.[82] In the telework circumstance, employees and supervisors have to work harder to maintain relationships with co-workers.[83] An isolation from daily activities arise of the company and may be less aware of other things going on to the company and a possible hatred from other employees arises from other employees who do not telecommute.[84] Telecommuting has come to be viewed by some as more of a "complement rather than a substitute for work in the workplace".[85]
Pitches to be your own boss. Our Consumer Action Center is hearing from a lot of callers who go to help-wanted sites, find an opportunity that looks good and then contact the supposed employer. It turns out to be a pitch for owning your own business, with promises of huge money. Unfortunately, the only ones making money are the people pushing startup kits and related costs.
Don’t teach for someone else’s company- create your OWN courses and promote them to your own audience (if you have a website or a blog). We use teachable.com to host our online courses. I create the course, put it on that site, and then students pay money to access the material. No need to apply to anything, but it does take a different kind of work!
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